Thursday, May 28, 2015

Amazing Ebbets Steal

Amazing Ebbets StealArtist:
Bill Purdom
Size:
18 x 33"
Limited Edition:
600


From the day he broke baseball's color barrier in 1947, Jackie Robinson injected the Dodgers with a special spirit that helped make his 10 years with the club the most exciting in the 68-year history of the Brooklyn franchise. He ran the bases with a kind of controlled recklessness that drove opponents crazy. Here, it's August 29, 1955, and Jackie's seen avoiding the tag of Cardinals catcher Bill Sarni to score on the front end of a triple steal at Ebbets Field. It is Robinson's 18th career steal of home plate. Gil Hodges (from second to third) and Sandy Amoros (first to second) moved up behind Robinson, and the Dodgers went on to score three runs in the inning to break open a 2-1 game. Also visible in the scene are Dodger batter Johnny Podres, Hall of Fame umpire Jocko Conlan, Cardinal pitcher Al Gettel and left fielder Rip Repulski. The Dodgers, of course, went on to win the 1955 World Series, a seven-game affair with the Yankees. It was the Brooklyn Dodgers' only World Championship.

Frames are aluminum section, silver in color, with plexiglass face, acid-free backing, and no mat.



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Veterans Classic Masterpiece

Veterans Classic MasterpieceArtist:
Bruce Becker
Size:
15 3/4 x 36"
Limited Edition:
600



It's October 21, 1993, Game 5 of the World Series at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, and Phillies' right-hander Curt Schilling is about to wrap up a 2-0 gem by retiring Paul Molitor on a fly ball to center fielder Len Dykstra. Schilling's gem follows Toronto's wacky 15-14 victory in Game 4 and marks the first-ever complete game shutout by a Phillies pitcher in post-season play. Schilling, the MVP of the NLCS, struck out six, walked three and allowed only five hits. Other Phillies on the field are Darren Daulton (C), John Kruk (1B), Mariano Duncan (2B), Kevin Stocker (SS), Kim Batiste (3B), Milt Thompson (LF) and Jim Eisenreich (RF). The home plate umpire is Tim McClelland.

Frames are aluminum section, silver in color, with plexiglass face, acid-free backing, and no mat



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Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Let's Play Two

Let's Play TwoArtist:
Bill Purdom
Size:
20 x 31"
Limited Edition:
600



It's May 12, 1970, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, and 39-year-old Ernie Banks, Mr. Cub, has just cracked the 500th home run of his magnificent Hall of Fame career. The blast, which lands two rows up in the left field bleachers and caroms back onto the field, comes off Atlanta Braves righthander Pat Jarvis. Banks, who came to the Cubs from the Negro League's Kansas City Monarchs in 1953, becomes only the ninth player in baseball history to reach the 500 mark (five others have done it since). Today, Banks and Eddie Mathews are tied for 12th on the all-time HR list with 512 each. In his 19-year major league career, all with the Cubs, Banks belted 12 grand slams, drove in over 100 runs eight times and connected for over 40 home runs in a season five times. He was the National League's home run leader in 1958 and 1960 and won the Most Valuable Player award twice, in 1958 and 1959. Banks was the Cubs' shortstop from 1954 through 1961 before spending the remainder of his career at first base. Although he never participated in a post-season game, he'll always be remembered for his great spirit (Let's play two!) and for his place among baseball's elite in the 500 home run club.

 Frames are aluminum section, silver in color, with plexiglass face, acid-free backing, and no mat.


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Shea Stadium Classic

Shea Stadium ClassicArtist:
Thomas Kolendra
Size:
15 1/2 x 36"
Limited Edition:
600


It's getting close to midnight, October 27, 1986, Game 7 of the World Series, and Jesse Orosco is on his knees exulting after striking out Marty Barrett for the final out of the game. Shea Stadium is rocking. After losing the first two games of the Series to the Red Sox, the Mets have stormed back to capture the second World Championship in their history and first since 1969. Gary Carter (C), Keith Hernandez (1B), Wally Backman (2B), Rafael Santana (SS), Ray Knight (3B), Mookie Wilson (LF), Lenny Dykstra (CF) and Darryl Strawberry (RF) are ready to join the celebration.

Frames are aluminum section, silver in color, with plexiglass face, acid-free backing, and no mat.



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Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Jeter Reaching Greatness


Jeter Reaching GreatnessArtist:
Bill Purdom
Size:
29 5/8 x 21 5/8"
Limited Edition:
600



In March of 1996, the Yankees spring training camp was buzzing with plenty of questions about a young shortstop named Derek Jeter. Could he hit and field well enough at the big league level to replace an injured Tony Fernandez? Was this 21-year-old who grew up in Kalamazoo, Michigan, ready for the bright lights of New York City? In the first game of the season in Cleveland, Jeter cracked a homer and answered some of the doubters. That rookie season featured nine more homers, 148 hits, an on-base-percentage of .370, and a 17-game hit streak that is second in Yankee history to Joe DiMaggio's 18-game rookie hit streak in 1936. After batting .369 in the 1996 post-season, and being an integral part of a World Championship club, Jeter collected the American League Rookie of the Year trophy as the questions faded. Over the next ten years, Jeter proved his first season was not a fluke with 173 more homers, and a career batting average of .317 and a postseason average of .314 in 119 games. The 7-time All Star was the MVP of both the All-Star Game and the World Series in 2000, was named the Yankees 11th team captain in 2003, won the Silver Slugger award and has been the recipient of 3 consecutive Gold Glove awards. He also has 4 World Series rings. Here, from a game in 1998, he dives to rob a hit from a Minnesota Twin while displaying the range that makes him one of the games best fielding shortstops. The questions are gone, Jeter is the heir to Yankee greatness.

Frames are aluminum section, silver in color, with plexiglass face, acid-free backing, and no mat.



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Monday, May 18, 2015

Pedro (Martinez Stopper) Nomar & Troy

Pedro (Martinez Stopper) Nomar & TroyArtist:
Bill Purdom
Size:
29 5/8 x 21 5/8"
Limited Edition:
600




On April 11, 1998, Boston's Pedro Martinez made his Fenway Park™ debut with a two hit gem against the Seattle Mariners™. Here, artist Bill Purdom captured the event with Nomar Garciaparra at shortstop and Troy O'Leary in left field. It was a scene that foreshadowed a classic ending to the American League™ Division Series against the Cleveland Indians on October 11, 1999. Facing a two game deficit, Boston rallied to force the decisive game, but trailed early. In the third inning, an intentional walk to Garciaparra, who had hit a two-run homer in the first, loaded the bases. On the next pitch, O'Leary made the Indians pay, launching the ball into the right centerfield seats to give the Sox a 7-5 lead. That lead was short lived, and with the game tied at eight in the fourth, Martinez entered from the bullpen. A question mark since game one due to an injured back/shoulder, Martinez hurled no-hit ball over the final six innings while striking out eight. In the seventh, following another intentional pass to Garciaparra, O'Leary hit a three-run blast giving the Sox the lead for good. A Garciaparra RBI double in the ninth made it 12-8 and when Martinez struck out Omar Vizquel to end the game, Boston had a series with the Yankees for the pennant. Bill Purdom's trio, once shown on a cool April day, would return to Fenway in October with hopes of bringing home the elusive World Championship that has escaped Beantown since 1918.

Frames are aluminum section, silver in color, with plexiglass face, acid-free backing, and no mat.

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